Advertisement
Canadian Journal of Cardiology

In Memoriam: Dr Charles R. Kerr

      Career and Contributions to Cardiovascular Medicine in Canada

      We are saddened to report the loss of a giant in Canadian cardiovascular medicine and a truly amazing human being, Dr Charlie Kerr, in May of 2017. Charlie’s passion for cardiovascular medicine was evident in his care of patients, his research, and teaching. His contributions to health care are invaluable and for that we all owe him a debt of gratitude. These were felt at the bedside, in his hospital at St Paul’s, in his Province at University of British Columbia (UBC) and Cardiac Services BC, and both nationally and internationally through the Canadian Cardiovascular Society (CCS). His professional advice has touched thousands of patients and dozens of his colleagues.
      Despite being born in Ontario, Charlie was a Vancouverite through and through. The son of an internist, Charlie followed in his father’s footsteps and completed his medical studies, internal medicine and cardiology residencies at UBC. After training in London, England, then pursuing an Electrophysiology Fellowship at Duke University, North Carolina, he came back to Vancouver in 1981 as the first fully-trained Electrophysiologist in British Columbia (BC). He initially started practice at UBC Hospital and became the Head of the UBC Division of Cardiology in 1988 and held that position for 15 years.
      Charlie moved to St Paul’s Hospital medical staff in 1993 when the heart rhythm program was relocated there, and was appointed Head of Cardiology at St Paul’s Hospital in 1995, a position that he held until 2003. In this hospital he called home, Charlie was instrumental in building bridges in the St Paul’s Heart Centre, providing crucial support and guidance to the Electrophysiology Program during a time when it needed clarity of purpose and expansion. Charlie was also a great proponent of under-serviced areas of cardiology. He was committed to the health of rural and First Nations people and continued to fly to northern BC and the Yukon for his peripatetic clinics, even as his health failed.
      Charlie also had a tremendous commitment to research. During his formative years at Duke, he had many important contributions in the nascent field of invasive electrophysiology (EP) and Wolff-Parkinson-White evaluation and treatment. Upon his return to BC, his inquisitive nature led him to investigate a wide variety of fields, from the pharmacology of mexiletine to long-QT syndrome in First Nations people from Northern BC. His research dedication in BC showed through his work with the Heart and Stroke Foundation of BC and Yukon. He was Chair of the Research Evaluation Committee and a member of the Board of Directors, as well as Chair of the Special Initiatives Review Committee. He also helped in creating the UBC Heart & Stroke Foundation Chair in Cardiology and became the first and original holder of that chair in 1997.
      Charlie was a valued investigator and collaborator on many of the seminal contributions from the Canadian EP community. Perhaps his most important contributions came as he focused on the management of atrial fibrillation (AF) in his mid and late career, particularly through the Canadian Registry of Atrial Fibrillation and the quality initiatives of the CCS. It is easy to forget that AF was not “in vogue” as a research field at the time, but he recognized its importance to patient care and population health.
      Charlie’s provincial contribution was further visible as a leader in the development of cardiac services in BC. He was the founding Chair of the Provincial Advisory Panel on Cardiac Care when it was established in 2003, an advisory committee to the Ministry of Health. In this role, he oversaw and advised Cardiac Services British Columbia on the provision of all tertiary and quaternary cardiac procedures and services for the Province.
      On a national level, Charlie was intensely involved with activities of the CCS. Charlie led or took part in more than a dozen committees and working groups since being awarded the CCS Young Investigator Award in 1983. He co-chaired the Joint Organizing Committee for the Canadian Cardiovascular Congress (CCC) and was the CCS Annual Meeting Chair from 2004 to 2006. He chaired the 1996 CCS Consensus Conference on Atrial Fibrillation and co-chaired an update in 2005. He served as a CCS Council member from 1988 to 1993 and was CCS President from 2008-2010. During his presidency, the Society purchased the Canadian Journal of Cardiology which has since blossomed under the organization’s stewardship.
      A defining trait of Charlie was his dedication to fostering the next generation of cardiovascular specialists and researchers through his generosity and work on the Board of the Canadian Cardiovascular Society Academy (CCSA). Charlie was influential in the development of the Have-a-Heart Bursary program, for which he was an adjudicator for 5 years. In 2013, Charlie was recognized by his peers for his contributions on a national scale by being awarded the CCS Annual Achievement Award.
      Charlie commanded a great deal of respect from his colleagues as well as hospital and university administration. He was a consensus builder, and his wise and measured decisions were greatly appreciated by all who had the pleasure to engage with him.
      Personal Perspective: George Klein
      I first met Charlie in 1976, when he was looking for a place to live in Durham, North Carolina for his soon to be fellowship at Duke University. I preceded him there and I gave him the low down on the area and suggested he move into my unit at Croasdaile Apartments with my assurances that it was a nice, clean place. Shortly before I left, I looked at the paper and read about a grisly murder at the Cricket Inn, 1 block from our unit. Feeling compelled to tell Charlie, I did so and got a casual Kerr shrug that this was of little import to him.
      We became friends after his return to Canada and shared a condo unit at Whistler where both of our families shared many happy (and sometimes hectic) times. My fondest memories of Charlie were as a skiing partner, and I was eternally impressed with his sense of direction. He knew every rock and tree on the mountain, and I enjoyed a personal guide for many years.
      Charlie, as all his friends know, had health issues for some years and couldn’t continue to ski. Almost to the end, he kept his skis ready to go at our unit fully optimistic that he would get back at some point. Whistler and Charlie will always be linked fondly in my memories and the bonds between our families will endure.
      Personal Perspective: Karin Humphries
      I first met Charlie Kerr when I applied for the position of Research Director at the Heart and Stroke Foundation of BC & Yukon. I had just completed by Executive MBA at Simon Fraser University and was eager to apply my new ‘management’ skills in the research field. Charlie, as a great believer in research and health promotion, became my mentor and supporter, including when I decided to return to school to complete my PhD in The Netherlands. Going back to school was not an easy choice, but Charlie was so supportive that it made the choice and transition so much easier.
      When I returned to Vancouver in 2000, Charlie agreed to take me on as a post-doctoral fellow, giving me the opportunity to conduct research using his ground-breaking Canadian Registry of Atrial Fibrillation database. I will be forever grateful for the opportunity to work with him on this project and to collaborate with some of the leading AF researchers in Canada.
      While my interests evolved from AF to acute coronary syndromes and eventually the examination of sex and gender differences in cardiovascular disease diagnosis, treatment, and outcomes, Charlie’s support never wavered.
      In the winter, Susan Crooks, his long-time secretary, and I would join him to ski in Whistler. While he was a much better skier than I was, we had a great time and I will remember those days fondly. I will also remember and treasure the lunches we had after he retired. It was great to see him in an informal setting.
      Charlie really was a giant in the field of cardiology, but he was also a kind, generous, and thoughtful person, who touched the lives of physicians and researchers in all areas of cardiology practice and research.
      Personal Perspective: Marc Deyell
      I had the privilege of becoming one of Charlie’s colleagues in 2012, when he recruited me back to Vancouver. Charlie had already been influential during my training, having taken the seed of EP in my brain, and turned it into an all-encompassing, invasive species.
      It wasn’t until I became his colleague that I truly appreciated Charlie’s legacy. In this era of increasing “interventionalization” of EP, he was certainly not at the forefront of new procedures or devices. He was a people person, and not striving to be the best technician.
      He was a big-picture person too, something that took me a while to realize. I would often be frustrated by some of his day-to-day disorganization during my first few years in practice. He cared less for the small details but I soon learned that his gaze was much broader and focused outwards. Through his roles with UBC, the Canadian Cardiovascular Society or Cardiac Services BC, he always wanted to make a bigger impact, and his lens wasn’t focused solely on niche EP issues but rather on broader issues of cardiovascular care.
      I’m going to miss Charlie. He’s left a wonderful legacy of heart rhythm care in BC. Yet I’m deeply saddened that he didn’t have the chance to relax in retirement and appreciate all that he had accomplished. Unfortunately, that was never meant to be but I will always remember him as a leader, teacher, mentor and friend.
      What a man. What a person. Thank you, Charlie, for everything.
      Marc W. Deyell, MD, MSc
      Division of Cardiology
      Department of Medicine
      University of British Columbia
      Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
      Anne A. Ferguson, MBA
      Canadian Cardiovascular Society
      Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
      Linda Palmer
      Canadian Cardiovascular Society
      Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
      Karin H. Humphries, MBA, DSc
      Division of Cardiology
      Department of Medicine
      University of British Columbia
      Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
      George J. Klein, MD
      Division of Cardiology
      Department of Medicine
      Western University
      London, Ontario, Canada
      Andrew D. Krahn, MD
      Division of Cardiology
      Department of Medicine
      University of British Columbia
      Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
      Canadian Cardiovascular Society
      Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

      Carrière et contributions à la médecine cardiovasculaire au Canada

      Nous sommes profondément attristés d’annoncer la perte d’un géant de la médecine cardiovasculaire au Canada, et d’un homme vraiment extraordinaire, le Dr Charlie Kerr, qui nous a quittés en mai 2017. La passion du Dr Kerr pour la médecine cardiovasculaire était évidente dans les soins qu’il prodiguait à ses patients, dans ses recherches et dans son enseignement. Ses contributions aux soins de santé sont inestimables et nous lui devons une dette de gratitude. Ces contributions étaient ressenties au chevet de ses patients, à l’hôpital St. Paul, dans sa province à l’Université de la Colombie-Britannique ainsi qu’aux Cardiac Services BC, et tant à l’échelle nationale qu’internationale par l’entremise de la Société canadienne de cardiologie (SCC). Ses conseils professionnels ont été appréciés par des milliers de patients et des douzaines de collègues.
      En dépit de sa naissance en Ontario, le Dr Kerr était un Vancouvérois jusque dans l’âme. Fils d’un interniste, le Dr Kerr a suivi les traces de son père, et a terminé des études en médecine et effectué une résidence en médecine interne ainsi qu’une résidence en cardiologie à l’Université de la Colombie-Britannique. Après des études à Londres, en Angleterre, il a entrepris un stage en électrophysiologie à l’Université Duke, en Caroline du Nord, puis est revenu à Vancouver en 1981 en tant que premier électrophysiologiste de Colombie-Britannique ayant reçu une formation complète. Il a commencé à pratiquer à l’UBC Hospital et a accédé au poste de chef de la division de cardiologie de l’Université de la Colombie-Britannique en 1988, une responsabilité qu’il a conservée pendant 15 ans.
      Par la suite, le Dr Kerr est devenu membre du personnel médical de l’Hôpital St. Paul en 1993, lorsque le programme de rythmologie a été réinstallé dans cet établissement. Il a été nommé chef de la cardiologie à l’Hôpital St. Paul en 1995, un poste qu’il a occupé jusqu’en 2003. À l’intérieur de cet hôpital où il se sentait chez lui, il a joué un rôle déterminant dans la création de liens au sein du St. Paul’s Heart Centre, et a fourni l’orientation et le soutien nécessaires au programme d’électrophysiologie à une époque où ce domaine avait besoin d’un objectif clair et d’une expansion. Il a aussi contribué à promouvoir considérablement les domaines de la cardiologie qui étaient mal desservis. Il s’est engagé à l’égard de la santé des résidents des régions rurales et des membres des Premières Nations, et a continué de parcourir le nord de la Colombie-Britannique et le Yukon en avion pour tenir ses cliniques itinérantes, même lorsque sa santé a décliné.
      Le Dr Kerr a aussi démontré un engagement remarquable dans la recherche. Au cours de ses années de formation à l’Université Duke, il a fait de nombreuses contributions au domaine naissant de l’électrophysiologie invasive, ainsi que de l’évaluation et du traitement pour le syndrome de Wolff-Parkinson-White. Dès son retour en Colombie-Britannique, sa curiosité naturelle l’a mené à faire des recherches dans plusieurs domaines différents, allant de la pharmacologie de la méxilétine au syndrome du QT long chez des membres des Premières Nations dans le nord de la Colombie-Britannique. Ses formidables efforts en recherche en Colombie-Britannique étaient évidents dans son travail au sein de la Fondation des maladies du cœur et de l’AVC de la C.-B. et du Yukon. Il a occupé les postes de président du Comité d’évaluation de la recherche, de membre du conseil d’administration, ainsi que de président du Comité d’examen des initiatives spéciales. Il a aussi contribué à la création de la chaire en cardiologie de la Fondation des maladies du cœur et de l’AVC à l’Université de la Colombie-Britannique, et est devenu son premier titulaire en 1997.
      Le Dr Kerr était un chercheur et un collaborateur très apprécié dans le cadre des nombreuses contributions novatrices de la communauté d’électrophysiologie canadienne. Ses contributions les plus importantes sont peut-être celles où il a mis l’accent sur la prise en charge de la fibrillation auriculaire en milieu et fin de carrière, surtout grâce au Canadian Registry of Atrial Fibrillation (Registre canadien de la fibrillation auriculaire) et aux initiatives de qualité de la SCC. Il est facile d’oublier que la fibrillation auriculaire n’était pas « à la mode » en tant que domaine de recherche à l’époque, mais il a reconnu son importance pour les soins des patients et la santé de la population.
      La contribution du Dr Kerr à l’échelle provinciale s’est manifestée davantage lorsqu’il est devenu chef de file de la création des services de cardiologie en Colombie-Britannique. Il a été le président fondateur du comité consultatif provincial sur les soins cardiaques lors de sa création en 2003, un comité consultatif auprès du ministère de la Santé. Dans ce rôle, il a supervisé et conseillé Cardiac Services BC concernant la prestation de toutes les interventions et de tous les services de cardiologie tertiaires et quaternaires pour la province.
      À l’échelle nationale, il était fortement impliqué dans les activités de la Société canadienne de cardiologie (SCC). Le Dr Kerr a dirigé ou a été membre de plus d’une douzaine de comités et de groupes de travail depuis l’époque où il a reçu le Prix à un jeune chercheur de la SCC en 1983. Il a été coprésident du comité d’organisation mixte pour le Congrès canadien sur la santé cardiovasculaire (CCSC) et président de l’assemblée annuelle de la SCC de 2004 à 2006. Il a été président de la Conférence de consensus sur la fibrillation auriculaire de la SCC en 1996, et coprésident d’une mise à jour en 2005. Il a été membre du Conseil de la SCC de 1988 à 1993, et président de la SCC de 2008 à 2010. Au cours de son mandat à titre de président, la Société a acheté le Journal canadien de cardiologie qui a connu beaucoup de succès depuis lors sous la gestion de l’organisme.
      Un trait marquant de caractère du Dr Kerr a été son dévouement à promouvoir la prochaine génération de spécialistes et de chercheurs dans le domaine cardiovasculaire, grâce à sa générosité et à ses efforts au Conseil de l’Académie de la Société canadienne de cardiologie (ASCC). Il a joué un rôle influent dans la création du programme de bourses Ayez du cœur, pour lequel il a été membre du jury pendant 5 ans. En 2013, il a été reconnu par ses pairs pour ses contributions à l’échelle nationale en recevant le Prix annuel d’excellence de la SCC.
      Le Dr Kerr jouissait d’un grand respect parmi ses collègues ainsi qu’au sein de l’administration de l’hôpital et de l’université. Il était un facilitateur de consensus, et ses décisions sages et mesurées ont été grandement appréciées par tous ceux qui ont eu le plaisir de collaborer avec lui.
      Point de vue personnel : George Klein
      J’ai rencontré Charlie pour la première fois en 1976, au moment où il cherchait un logement à Durham, en Caroline du Nord, pour commencer son stage à l’Université Duke. Je l’avais précédé là-bas, et je lui ai appris ce que je savais sur le secteur. Je lui ai suggéré de s’installer dans mon logement au Croasdaile Apartments en lui assurant que c’était un endroit propre et très bien. Peu de temps avant mon départ, en jetant un coup d’œil au journal, j’ai appris qu’un meurtre sordide avait été commis au Cricket Inn, à un pâté de maisons de notre logement. J’ai informé Charlie, comme je me sentais obligé de le faire, obtenant en réponse un haussement d’épaules qui indiquait que pour lui cela avait peu d’importance.
      Nous sommes devenus des amis après son retour au Canada et nous avons partagé un condominium à Whistler où nos deux familles ont vécu de bons moments, quoique parfois mouvementés. Mes plus beaux souvenirs de Charlie sont ceux où il était mon partenaire de ski, et il m’a impressionné pour toujours par son sens de l’orientation. Il connaissait chaque roche et chaque arbre sur la montagne, et j’ai profité d’un guide personnel pendant de nombreuses années.
      Comme tous ses amis le savent, Charlie a dû arrêter de faire du ski à cause de problèmes de santé dont il souffrait depuis plusieurs années. Mais dans notre condominium, presque jusqu’à la fin, il a gardé ses skis prêts pour remonter sur les pentes, ayant bon espoir qu’il pourrait recommencer à skier à un moment donné. Whistler et Charlie seront toujours liés affectueusement dans ma mémoire et les liens entre nos deux familles perdureront.
      Point de vue personnel : Karin Humphries
      Ma première rencontre avec Charlie remonte à l’époque où j’ai fait une demande d’emploi pour le poste de directrice de recherche à la Fondation des maladies du cœur et de l’AVC de la C.-B. et du Yukon. Je venais de terminer mes études de MBA pour cadres à l’Université Simon Fraser, et j’étais impatiente d’appliquer mes nouvelles compétences en « gestion » dans le domaine de la recherche. Charlie, qui croyait beaucoup en la recherche et la promotion de la santé, est devenu mon mentor et allié, y compris lorsque j’ai décidé de retourner aux études pour obtenir mon doctorat aux Pays-Bas. Même si retourner aux études n’était pas un choix facile, son formidable soutien a rendu cette décision et la transition qui a suivi beaucoup plus faciles.
      Lorsque je suis retournée à Vancouver en 2000, Charlie m’a acceptée comme chercheuse boursière postdoctorale, me donnant la possibilité d’effectuer des recherches en utilisant sa base de données avant-gardiste du Canadian Registry of Atrial Fibrillation (Registre canadien de la fibrillation auriculaire). Je serai toujours reconnaissante de l’occasion de travailler avec lui dans le cadre de ce projet, et de collaborer avec certains des principaux chercheurs en fibrillation auriculaire au Canada.
      Même si mes intérêts sont passés de la fibrillation auriculaire au syndrome coronarien aigu et, par la suite, à l’examen des différences liées au sexe et au genre dans le diagnostic, le traitement et les résultats pour les maladies cardiovasculaires, le soutien de Charlie n’a jamais faibli.
      Pendant l’hiver, Susan Crooks, sa secrétaire de longue date, et moi-même faisions du ski avec lui à Whistler. Même s’il était un meilleur skieur que moi, nous avions beaucoup de plaisir, et je me souviendrai toujours de ces bons moments. Je chérirai aussi longtemps le souvenir de ces repas pris avec lui après son départ à la retraite. C’était formidable de le rencontrer dans un milieu informel.
      Un vrai géant dans le domaine de la cardiologie, Charlie était aussi un homme plein de gentillesse, de générosité et de prévenance. Il a marqué la vie de médecins et de chercheurs dans tous les domaines de la pratique et de la recherche en cardiologie.
      Point de vue personnel : Marc Deyell
      J’ai eu le privilège de devenir l’un des collègues de Charlie en 2012, lorsqu’il m’a recruté pour un poste à Vancouver. Il avait déjà joué un rôle marquant durant ma formation, m’« infectant » peu à peu, pour ainsi dire, de sa passion dévorante pour l’électrophysiologie.
      Ce n’est qu’à partir du moment où je suis devenu son collègue que j’ai réellement apprécié son héritage. Dans cette ère « d’interventionalisation » accrue de l’électrophysiologie, il n’était certainement pas à l’avant-garde de nouvelles procédures ou de dispositifs novateurs. Il était profondément humain et n’essayait pas d’être le meilleur technicien.
      Il avait aussi une vision globale des choses, et il m’a fallu un certain temps pour m’en apercevoir. J’étais souvent frustré par une certaine désorganisation journalière de sa part durant mes premières années de pratique. Il accordait moins d’importance aux petits détails, mais j’ai appris rapidement que son regard était tourné vers un vaste horizon extérieur. Dans le cadre de ses rôles à l’Université de la Colombie-Britannique, à la Société canadienne de cardiologie ou au sein de Cardiac Services BC, il voulait toujours avoir un plus grand impact, et il ne visait pas seulement les problèmes du créneau de l’électrophysiologie, mais plutôt les questions plus larges des soins cardiovasculaires.
      Charlie va me manquer. Il a laissé un merveilleux héritage dans le domaine des soins pour les problèmes de rythme cardiaque en Colombie-Britannique. Cependant, le fait qu’il n’a pas eu la chance de jouir de sa vie de retraité et d’apprécier tout ce qu’il a accompli m’attriste profondément. Malheureusement pour lui, cet âge d’or ne devait jamais arriver. Je me console toutefois en songeant que sa vie professionnelle a été bien remplie comme chef, professeur, mentor et ami dont je me souviendrai toujours.
      Quel homme! Quelle personne! Merci pour tout, Dr Kerr.
      Marc W. Deyell, MD, MSc
      Division of Cardiology
      Department of Medicine
      University of British Columbia
      Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
      Anne A. Ferguson, MBA
      Canadian Cardiovascular Society
      Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
      Linda Palmer
      Canadian Cardiovascular Society
      Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
      Karin H. Humphries, MBA, DSc
      Division of Cardiology
      Department of Medicine
      University of British Columbia
      Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
      George J. Klein, MD
      Division of Cardiology
      Department of Medicine
      Western University
      London, Ontario, Canada
      Andrew D. Krahn, MD
      Division of Cardiology
      Department of Medicine
      University of British Columbia
      Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
      Canadian Cardiovascular Society
      Ottawa, Ontario, Canada