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Canadian Journal of Cardiology

A New Way to Listen to Patients: Heeding Patient Reported Experiences to Improve Quality of Care

  • Michelle M. Graham
    Correspondence
    Corresponding author: Dr Michelle M. Graham, Division of Cardiology, University of Alberta Hospital, 8440-112 St, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2R7, Canada. Tel.: +1-780-407-1590; fax: +1-780-407-1496.
    Affiliations
    Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

    Mazankowski Alberta Heart Institute, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
    Search for articles by this author
  • Colleen M. Norris
    Affiliations
    Faculty of Nursing, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

    Mazankowski Alberta Heart Institute, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
    Search for articles by this author
Published:August 21, 2019DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cjca.2019.05.026
      Person-centred care (PCC) places the person first by providing care that is respectful and responsive to individual preferences, needs, and values and in turn guides all clinical decisions.

      Health Innovation Network, South London. What Is Person-Centred Care and Why Is It Important? Available at: https://healthinnovationnetwork.com/system/ckeditor_assets/attachments/41/what_is_person-centred_care_and_why_is_it_important.pdf. Accessed July 24, 2019.

      Although this may seem obvious, in reality most health systems actually require patients to adapt to and navigate an established structure, rather than listening to what patients have to say, and involving them in decision-making. PCC, when done correctly, improves the experience people have with care, encourages more involvement in decisions, impacts health outcomes, reduces the use of services influencing the cost of care, and improves the satisfaction of the professionals who provide the care.

      Health Innovation Network, South London. What Is Person-Centred Care and Why Is It Important? Available at: https://healthinnovationnetwork.com/system/ckeditor_assets/attachments/41/what_is_person-centred_care_and_why_is_it_important.pdf. Accessed July 24, 2019.

      PCC is achieved by integrating clinical data with both impartially collected patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) and patient-reported experience measures (PREMs). Whereas PROMs are captured by standardized, validated questionnaires that can be either generic (such as the Short Form-36) or disease-specific (such as the Seattle Angina Questionnaire), PREMs examine how processes of care impact patient experience. PREMs are designed to be objective rather than subjective, but still manage to capture functional (eg, experience with the physical environment and hospital facility) and relational (eg, interaction with health care providers) information. Therefore, both PROMs and PREMs play critical roles in the evaluation and delivery of high-quality patient care. One of the challenges is how to collect these data broadly and yet inexpensively.
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      References

      1. Health Innovation Network, South London. What Is Person-Centred Care and Why Is It Important? Available at: https://healthinnovationnetwork.com/system/ckeditor_assets/attachments/41/what_is_person-centred_care_and_why_is_it_important.pdf. Accessed July 24, 2019.

      2. Canadian Institute of Health Information (CIHI). CIHI’s Strategic Plan 2016-2021. Available at: https://www.cihi.ca/sites/default/files/document/strategicplan2016-2021-enweb.pdf. Accessed July 24, 2019.

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