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Canadian Journal of Cardiology

The Tale of Two Valves: Role of the Ross Procedure for Aortic Stenosis in Young Adults

Published:April 21, 2022DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cjca.2022.04.012
      In the June 2022 issue of the Canadian Journal of Cardiology, Rahmouni and colleagues reviewed management strategies for aortic stenosis in the low-risk patient.
      • Rahmouni K.
      • Buchko M.
      • Boodhwani M.
      • et al.
      Aortic stenosis in the low-risk patient: overview of the management options and possible permutations.
      We commend the authors for their well-written overview. Although the treatment for aortic valve pathologies in older patients is more straightforward, the ideal treatment in younger low-risk patients remains a subject of debate.
      • Chen L.
      • Salim Hammoud M.
      • Jiang M.
      • Bakir N.
      • Karamlou T.
      Age- and sex-matched controls should not be the standard for the Ross procedure.
      This subset of patients constitutes a clinical challenge owing to longer life expectancy and higher cumulative lifetime risk of prosthesis-related complications.
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      References

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        • Buchko M.
        • Boodhwani M.
        • et al.
        Aortic stenosis in the low-risk patient: overview of the management options and possible permutations.
        Can J Cardiol. 2022; 38: 836-839
        • Chen L.
        • Salim Hammoud M.
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        Age- and sex-matched controls should not be the standard for the Ross procedure.
        JTCVS Open. 2022; https://doi.org/10.1016/j.xjon.2022.05.015
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        Eur J Cardiothorac Surg. 2022; https://doi.org/10.1093/ejcts/ezac267
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        Risk of endocarditis extension in Ross reintervention with transcatheter pulmonary valve replacement.
        J Am Coll Cardiol. 2022; 79: e457
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      Linked Article

      • Aortic Stenosis in the Low-Risk Patient: Overview of the Management Options and Possible Permutations
        Canadian Journal of CardiologyVol. 38Issue 6
        • Preview
          Aortic valve intervention can take several forms: surgical valve replacement with a stented or stentless bioprosthesis or with a mechanical prosthesis, transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI), and the Ross procedure.1 Although the choice of strategy is often straightforward in the elderly and high-risk population, young and low-risk patients with aortic stenosis are challenging to the heart team, namely because of their longer life expectancy, and higher cumulative lifetime risk of valve-related complications.
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