Advertisement
Canadian Journal of Cardiology

Tackling the Other Pandemic: The Rise in Cardiovascular

        Tackling the Other Pandemic: The Rise in Cardiovascular Diseases

        If you’ve been following news from the Canadian Cardiovascular Society (CCS), you’ll know that June 2022 marks the 75th anniversary of our society. Since January, we’ve highlighted significant milestones and accomplishments, and we have much to be proud of as a professional community.
        Along with the strides we’ve made in advancing our profession, the CCS has also helped over time to improve the cardiovascular care and health of Canadians. Age-adjusted death rates from cardiovascular disease have declined by more than 70% due to progress in prevention and treatment. This is one of the most important public health achievements of the 20th century. Working with national partners, including our federal government, health charities, national health professional groups, and industry, we made leaps in research, practice, and advocacy and have achieved high-impact public health policy changes (eg, taxation to curb smoking and vaping, nutrition labelling, bans on trans fats, etc). These major accomplishments reveal the positive impact we can have when we set goals and work together.
        Our work is not complete, however. More recent data suggest the progress we’ve made in reducing mortality has stalled. Cardiovascular disease remains a very dominant cause of death. Nearly 80% of cardiovascular deaths are attributable to coronary artery disease, stroke, hypertension, and heart failure. In Canada, the burden of cardiovascular disease is unequally distributed across population groups, with wide geographic and demographic inequities.
        Heart disease is the number one cause of years of life lost due to premature mortality.
        GBD 2015 Mortality and Causes of Death Collaborators
        Global, regional, and national life expectancy, all-cause mortality, and cause-specific mortality for 249 causes of death, 1980-2015: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2015.
        The absolute number of people living with a heart condition is increasing, and the need for management and treatment resources for heart disease will continue to be high. Recent Statistics Canada data

        Statistics Canada. Table 13-10-0837-01 Life expectancy and other elements of the complete life table, single-year estimates, Canada, all provinces except Prince Edward Island. Available at: https://doi.org/10.25318/1310083701-eng. Accessed April 1, 2022.

        and the Oxford study,
        • Aburto J.M.
        • Schöley J.
        • Kashnitsky I.
        • et al.
        Quantifying impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic through life-expectancy losses: a population-level study of 29 countries.
        both published earlier this year, change our outlook on life expectancy. Canadian life expectancy has dropped by almost one year. In the United States, the average American male now has a life expectancy at birth of less than 75 years. This is not all due to COVID-19 — at least not directly. Mortality rates from cardiovascular diseases have risen more than those of any other non–COVID-19 ailment.

        Statistics Canada. Table 13-10-0801-01 Leading causes of death, total population (age standardization using 2011 population). Available at: https://doi.org/10.25318/1310080101-eng. Accessed April 1, 2022.

        And there are many more people and younger people dying from cardiovascular disease than from COVID-19, at any stage of the COVID-19 pandemic. Overall, there has been increasing cardiovascular disease mortality worldwide. We know too well the 2010 American Heart Association goal of reducing deaths from cardiovascular disease and stroke by 20 percent by 2020 did not pan out — quite to the contrary.
        History of the American Heart Association.
        The Wall Street Journal recently reported, “COVID is neither the deadliest nor the most preventable of all ailments. That distinction goes to cardiovascular disease, a pandemic so common it is invisible, so routinely lethal it seems normal, and so ingrained in the fabric of modern society it seems natural. Every year, cardiovascular disease kills twice as many people, at a younger average age, as COVID has at its worst, and since 2020, there’s been a surge in fatalities from heart disease and stroke.
        • McKay B.
        Deaths from heart disease and stroke rose sharply during pandemic.
        Indeed, a recent study showed that mortality rates from heart disease and stroke rose 4.3% and 6.4%, respectively, in 2020 in the United States.
        • Sidney S.
        • Lee C.
        • Liu J.
        • Khan S.S.
        • Lloyd-Jones D.M.
        • Rana J.S.
        Age-adjusted mortality rates and age and risk-associated contributions to change in heart disease and stroke mortality, 2011-2019 and 2019-2020.
        ,
        GBD 2015 Mortality and Causes of Death Collaborators
        Global, regional, and national life expectancy, all-cause mortality, and cause-specific mortality for 249 causes of death, 1980-2015: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2015.
        Canada also saw the number of heart disease deaths increase beyond that of any other non–COVID disease.

        Statistics Canada. Table 13-10-0801-01 Leading causes of death, total population (age standardization using 2011 population). Available at: https://doi.org/10.25318/1310080101-eng. Accessed April 1, 2022.

        This report is sobering, but we have the awareness, knowledge and public health tools necessary to prevent most early cardiovascular deaths. The question is whether we can muster the social, institutional, and political will to use them. The three leading drivers of heart attacks and strokes—accounting for around two-thirds of the global total—are tobacco use, hypertension, and air pollution. All three are preventable and none require making radical changes in society. Just as we saw with the effectiveness of seatbelts and immunization, Canada can lead the world by applying research, practice change, and public policy to cardiovascular disease. This way we can reaccelerate a downward trend in cardiovascular disease morbidity and mortality.
        How do we tackle a rise in cardiovascular diseases? On the part of CCS, we continue to work with national partners to answer high-impact research, clinical and policy questions. We continue with and steadily improve how we develop guidelines and mobilize information. We expand the breadth of the audiences we reach and the partners we work with. We fulfill multi-faceted evidence/awareness/education/advocacy action plans that specifically target heart failure, valve disease, and climate change in the cardiovascular domain.
        Most cardiovascular diseases can be prevented by addressing behavioural risk factors such as tobacco use, unhealthy diet and obesity, physical inactivity, and harmful use of alcohol. And if not successfully prevented, most cardiovascular diseases can successfully be treated to prevent death. As a heart surgeon, my usual encouragement to patients with advanced heart disease is that “at least, unlike many cancers or neurological diseases, we can fix your problem.” CCS members undoubtedly have a key role to play—perhaps now more than ever before.
        As I contemplate the distance we have travelled in 75 years, I feel proud of our accomplishments, but as it’s said, “this is a marathon, not a sprint.” Let’s set our goals with the next 75 years in mind and pace ourselves for the worthy—and worldly—challenges ahead.
        Marc Ruel, MD, MPH, FRCSC, FACC, FAHA, FCCS
        President, Canadian Cardiovascular Society

        S’attaquer à l’autre pandémie : l’augmentation des maladies cardiovasculaires

        Si vous avez suivi les nouvelles de la Société canadienne de cardiologie (SCC), vous savez qu'elle a célébré son 75e anniversaire en juin 2022. Depuis janvier, nous avons mis en lumière des étapes et des réalisations importantes, et nous avons tout lieu d’être fiers de notre communauté professionnelle.
        En plus des progrès réalisés dans l’avancement de notre profession, la SCC a également contribué au fil du temps à améliorer les soins cardiovasculaires et la santé des Canadiens. Les taux de mortalité liés aux maladies cardiovasculaires, ajustés en fonction de l’âge, ont diminué de plus de 70 pour cent grâce aux progrès réalisés en matière de prévention et de traitement. Il s’agit de l’une des réalisations les plus importantes du 20e siècle en matière de santé publique. En collaboration avec des partenaires nationaux, notamment le gouvernement fédéral, des organismes de bienfaisance du secteur de la santé, des groupes nationaux de professionnels de la santé et l’industrie, nous avons fait des bonds en avant dans les domaines de la recherche, de la pratique et de la défense de la cause, et nous avons apporté des changements de grande portée aux politiques de santé publique (p. ex., la taxation pour réduire le tabagisme et le vapotage, l’étiquetage nutritionnel, l’interdiction des gras trans, etc.). Ces grandes réalisations dévoilent l’incidence positive que nous pouvons avoir lorsque nous nous fixons des objectifs et travaillons ensemble.
        Cependant, notre travail n’est pas terminé. Des données plus récentes donnent à penser que les progrès réalisés dans la réduction de la mortalité sont au point mort. Les maladies cardiovasculaires restent la principale cause de décès. Près de 80 pour cent des décès dus à des maladies cardiovasculaires sont attribuables à la coronaropathie, aux accidents vasculaires cérébraux (AVC), à l’hypertension et à l’insuffisance cardiaque. Au Canada, le fardeau des maladies cardiovasculaires est inégalement réparti entre les groupes de population. En effet, nous constatons de grandes inégalités géographiques et démographiques.
        Les maladies cardiaques sont la première cause d’années de vie perdues en raison d’une mortalité prématurée.
        GBD 2015 Mortality and Causes of Death Collaborators
        Global, regional, and national life expectancy, all-cause mortality, and cause-specific mortality for 249 causes of death, 1980-2015: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2015.
        Le nombre absolu de personnes vivant avec un problème cardiaque est en augmentation et les besoins en ressources de gestion et de traitement des maladies cardiaques resteront élevés. Les données récentes de Statistique Canada

        Statistique Canada. Tableau 13-10-0837-01 Espérance de vie et autres éléments de la table complète de mortalité, estimations sur un an, Canada, toutes les provinces sauf l’Île-du-Prince-Édouard. Disponible à: https://doi.org/10.25318/1310083701-eng. Consulté le 1er avril 2022.

        et l’étude d’Oxford,
        • Aburto J.M.
        • Schöley J.
        • Kashnitsky I.
        • et al.
        Quantifying impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic through life-expectancy losses: a population-level study of 29 countries.
        toutes deux publiées au début de l’année, changent notre perspective sur l’espérance de vie. L’espérance de vie des Canadiens a diminué de près d’un an. Aux États-Unis, l'homme américain moyen a désormais une espérance de vie à la naissance inférieure à 75 ans. Tout cela n’est pas dû à la COVID-19, du moins pas directement. Les taux de mortalité dus aux maladies cardiovasculaires ont augmenté plus que ceux de toute autre affection non liée à la COVID-19.

        Statistique Canada. Tableau 13-10-0801-01 Principales causes de décès, population totale (normalisation selon l’âge utilisant la population de 2011). Disponible à: https://doi.org/10.25318/1310080101-fra. Consulté le 1er avril 2022.

        Il y a beaucoup plus de personnes et de jeunes gens qui meurent de maladies cardiovasculaires que de la COVID-19, par à tout moment de la pandémie de COVID-19. Dans l'ensemble, la mortalité due aux maladies cardiovasculaires a augmenté dans le monde entier. Nous ne savons que trop bien que l’objectif 2010 de l’American Heart Association visant à réduire de 20 pour cent les décès dus aux maladies cardiovasculaires et aux AVC avant 2020 n’a pas été atteint, bien au contraire.

        Statistics Canada. Table 13-10-0801-01 Leading causes of death, total population (age standardization using 2011 population). Disponible à: https://doi.org/10.25318/1310080101-eng. Accessed Consulté le 1er avril 2022.

        On annonçait récemment dans le Wall Street Journal que « la COVID n’est ni la plus mortelle ni la plus évitable de toutes les maladies. Cette distinction est due aux maladies cardiovasculaires, pandémie si courante qu’elle en est invisible, si régulièrement mortelle qu’elle en paraît normale, et si ancrée dans le tissu de la société moderne qu’elle en paraît naturelle. Chaque année, les maladies cardiovasculaires tuent deux fois plus de personnes, à un âge moyen plus jeune, que la COVID, et depuis 2020, on observe une augmentation des décès dus aux maladies cardiaques et aux AVC ». En effet, une étude récente a montré que les taux de mortalité dus aux maladies cardiaques et aux AVC ont augmenté respectivement de 4,3 pour cent et 6,4 pour cent en 2020 aux États-Unis.
        • McKay B.
        Deaths from heart disease and stroke rose sharply during pandemic.
        ,
        GBD 2015 Mortality and Causes of Death Collaborators
        Global, regional, and national life expectancy, all-cause mortality, and cause-specific mortality for 249 causes of death, 1980-2015: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2015.
        Le Canada a également connu une augmentation du nombre de décès dus aux maladies cardiaques supérieure à celle de toute autre maladie non liée à la COVID.

        Statistique Canada. Tableau 13-10-0801-01 Principales causes de décès, population totale (normalisation selon l’âge utilisant la population de 2011). Disponible à: https://doi.org/10.25318/1310080101-fra. Consulté le 1er avril 2022.

        Ce rapport donne à réfléchir, mais nous sommes sensibilisés et avons les connaissances et les outils de santé publique nécessaires pour prévenir la plupart des décès cardiovasculaires précoces. La question est de savoir si nous pouvons convaincre les intervenants sociaux, institutionnels et politiques de les utiliser. Les trois principaux facteurs de crises cardiaques et d’AVC (qui représentent environ deux tiers du total mondial) sont le tabagisme, l’hypertension et la pollution atmosphérique. Ces trois facteurs peuvent être évités, et aucun ne nécessite un changement radical de la société. Tout comme nous l’avons vu avec l’efficacité des ceintures de sécurité et de l’immunisation, le Canada peut être un chef de file mondial en appliquant la recherche, le changement de pratique et la politique publique aux maladies cardiovasculaires. De cette façon, nous pouvons accélérer la tendance à la baisse de la morbidité et de la mortalité dues aux maladies cardiovasculaires.
        Comment faire face à l’augmentation des maladies cardiovasculaires? De son côté, la SCC continue de travailler avec des partenaires nationaux pour répondre à des questions cliniques, politiques et de recherche de grande portée. Nous améliorons constamment la manière dont nous élaborons les lignes directrices et mettons à profit les informations. Nous élargissons l’éventail des publics que nous rejoignons et des partenaires avec lesquels nous travaillons. Nous réalisons des plans d’action à multiples facettes (les preuves, la sensibilisation, l’éducation, la défense de la cause) qui ciblent spécifiquement l’insuffisance cardiaque, les maladies valvulaires et le changement climatique dans le domaine cardiovasculaire.
        La plupart des maladies cardiovasculaires peuvent être évitées en s’attaquant aux facteurs de risque comportementaux tels que le tabagisme, une alimentation malsaine et l’obésité, la sédentarité et la consommation nocive d’alcool. Et si elles ne sont pas évitées, la plupart des maladies cardiovasculaires peuvent être traitées avec succès pour éviter la mort. En tant que chirurgien cardiaque, j’ai l’habitude d’encourager les patients souffrant d’une cardiopathie avancée en leur disant : « au moins, contrairement à de nombreux cancers et maladies neurologiques, nous pouvons résoudre votre problème. » Les membres de la SCC ont sans aucun doute un rôle clé à jouer—peut-être maintenant plus que jamais auparavant.
        Lorsque je constate le chemin que nous avons parcouru en 75 ans, je suis fier de nos réalisations, mais comme on dit, « il s’agit d’un marathon et non d’un sprint ». Fixons-nous donc des objectifs en gardant à l’esprit les 75 prochaines années, et préparons-nous aux grands défis qui nous attendent à l’échelle mondiale.
        Marc Ruel, MD, MPH, FRCSC, FACC, FAHA, FCCS
        Président, Société canadienne de cardiologie

        References

          • GBD 2015 Mortality and Causes of Death Collaborators
          Global, regional, and national life expectancy, all-cause mortality, and cause-specific mortality for 249 causes of death, 1980-2015: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2015.
          Lancet. 2016; 388: 1459-1544
        1. Statistics Canada. Table 13-10-0837-01 Life expectancy and other elements of the complete life table, single-year estimates, Canada, all provinces except Prince Edward Island. Available at: https://doi.org/10.25318/1310083701-eng. Accessed April 1, 2022.

          • Aburto J.M.
          • Schöley J.
          • Kashnitsky I.
          • et al.
          Quantifying impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic through life-expectancy losses: a population-level study of 29 countries.
          Int J Epidemiol. 2022; 51: 63-74
        2. Statistics Canada. Table 13-10-0801-01 Leading causes of death, total population (age standardization using 2011 population). Available at: https://doi.org/10.25318/1310080101-eng. Accessed April 1, 2022.

        3. History of the American Heart Association.
          (Available at:)
          • McKay B.
          Deaths from heart disease and stroke rose sharply during pandemic.
          Wall Street Journal. March 23, 2022; (March 23, 2022. Available at:)
          • Sidney S.
          • Lee C.
          • Liu J.
          • Khan S.S.
          • Lloyd-Jones D.M.
          • Rana J.S.
          Age-adjusted mortality rates and age and risk-associated contributions to change in heart disease and stroke mortality, 2011-2019 and 2019-2020.
          JAMA Netw Open. 2022; 5e223872

        Références

          • GBD 2015 Mortality and Causes of Death Collaborators
          Global, regional, and national life expectancy, all-cause mortality, and cause-specific mortality for 249 causes of death, 1980-2015: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2015.
          Lancet. 2016; 388: 1459-1544
        1. Statistique Canada. Tableau 13-10-0837-01 Espérance de vie et autres éléments de la table complète de mortalité, estimations sur un an, Canada, toutes les provinces sauf l’Île-du-Prince-Édouard. Disponible à: https://doi.org/10.25318/1310083701-eng. Consulté le 1er avril 2022.

          • Aburto J.M.
          • Schöley J.
          • Kashnitsky I.
          • et al.
          Quantifying impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic through life-expectancy losses: a population-level study of 29 countries.
          Int J Epidemiol. 2022; 51: 63-74
        2. Statistique Canada. Tableau 13-10-0801-01 Principales causes de décès, population totale (normalisation selon l’âge utilisant la population de 2011). Disponible à: https://doi.org/10.25318/1310080101-fra. Consulté le 1er avril 2022.

        3. Statistics Canada. Table 13-10-0801-01 Leading causes of death, total population (age standardization using 2011 population). Disponible à: https://doi.org/10.25318/1310080101-eng. Accessed Consulté le 1er avril 2022.

        4. History of the American Heart Association.
          (Disponible à:) (Consulté le 16 avril 2022)
          • McKay B.
          Deaths from heart disease and stroke rose sharply during pandemic.
          Wall Street Journal. March 23, 2022; (March 23, 2022. Disponible à:) (Consulté le 16 avril 2022)
          • Sidney S.
          • Lee C.
          • Liu J.
          • Khan S.S.
          • Lloyd-Jones D.M.
          • Rana J.S.
          Age-adjusted mortality rates and age and risk-associated contributions to change in heart disease and stroke mortality, 2011-2019 and 2019-2020.
          JAMA Netw Open. 2022; 5e223872