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Canadian Journal of Cardiology

Big Data, Big Expectations, and Big Judgements

      Big data are ubiquitous. Nowhere is this more evident than in the world of medicine in which electronic health records, radiologic images, and biological and genomic data are routinely collected and digitalized. This is highlighted by the exponential growth in “big data” publications (Fig. 1), with more than 5000 new PubMed publications in 2021. Although more modest, the same trend is evident in cardiovascular publications. The Canadian Journal of Cardiology has previously published on the utility of big data to investigate a novel investigator-initiated research hypotheses concerning prolonged labour and subsequent heart failure.
      • Kahane A.
      • Park A.L.
      • Ray J.G.
      Dysfunctional uterine activity in labour and premature adverse cardiac events: population-based cohort study.
      ,
      • Brophy J.M.
      Big data to assess potential pregnancy-related cardiovascular complications of difficult labour: original investigator-driven research is not dead.
      Figure thumbnail gr1
      Figure 1PubMed publications with key word “Big Data.” The annual number of publications in PubMed using the key word word “Big Data” in all publications (red) and with the additional key word “cardiovascular” (CV) (turquoise).
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